Restoration work on the Leaning Tower of Pisa is completed

Added 15/12/2010

An eight-year restoration project to clean up the Leaning Tower of Pisa has been completed. Restorers used syringes, chisels and lasers to carefully clean the ancient structure. The stonework on the Leaning Tower of Pisa had become weathered, and pigeons and tourists had also defaced the structure in parts. The tilt of the Leaning Tower of Pisa also caused rainwater to collect in places, which caused further damage.

Whilst the restoration project was taking place, the Leaning Tower of Pisa remained open to the public. Visitor entrance fees helped to fund the restoration project. Around one million tourists visit the Leaning Tower of Pisa each year, so it was necessary to keep the attraction open during its restoration to collect vital funding.

Construction of the Leaning Tower of Pisa began in 1174 and it took nearly 200 years to complete. During its lengthy construction period, it wasn’t until 1298 that the distinctive lean was observed. In 1990 the Leaning Tower of Pisa was closed to the public amidst concerns that the structure was unsafe. Investigative work ensued and the lean was corrected by a fraction so that the Leaning Tower of Pisa could be reopened.

The Leaning Tower of Pisa is on most people’s itinerary when they visit the Italian town of Pisa and it is one of Italy’s most famous tourist attractions. Without its lean, the tower might not have been quite so renowned and it would probably attract fewer visitors.

When many tourists visit the Leaning Tower of Pisa, they often take comical photographs of the structure. A common picture is to create the illusion that the person in the photograph is holding up the tower with their bare hands.

Entry into the Leaning Tower of Pisa is €15 and a guided tour of the building takes 35 minutes. Visitors with reduced mobility should be aware that there are 294 steps to climb to reach the top of the tower. The steps are in the form of a spiral staircase.